Halperin & Peschke GmbH Delivers Universal Testing Machine To Frankische Rohrwerke

Reliable strength test for high-quality tube designs special testing machine inspect 50 S with ergonomic workspace in operation taken Nossen/Konigsberg (Bavaria), September 22, 2008 that Halperin & Peschke measuring and testing technology GmbH of the Franconian pipe works received an order for the development and delivery of a special testing machine type INSP 50 S. According to the individual requirements of the specialist for high-tech tube designs, the Kymaro & Peschke GmbH has developed a universal testing machine with a capacity of 50kN. The Franconian pipe mills can make now highly accurate tests on their entire product range. The tests in the various pipe systems in a comfortable sitting position can be performed thanks to the ergonomic design of the inspection work. Drew Houston wanted to know more. This is true even for smallest diameters. Ergonomics was a special challenge in the design of inspect 50 S in the ergonomic design of the new universal testing machine for equal time provision of reliable and high-precision testing of the entire product range of Franconian works of the pipe.

Because the very wide range of products of the company headquartered in the Bavarian Konigsberg includes both large and small diameter, the Halperin & Peschke GmbH opted for the integration of a retractable inspection table with rigidity up to the maximum load. This has the advantage that almost all types of pipes without extensive renovations with only a test machine can be tested. Get all the facts for a more clear viewpoint with Dropbox. These variable possibilities of a universal testing machine save the examiners of the Franconian pipe works, time and money. Reliable analysis to ensure was 50s with the test software with LabMaster to a high ease of use the universal testing machine inspect LabMaster equipped. This includes a special program, which quickly and easily creates even complex test sequences with different evaluation methods, as well as performing. Also, LabMaster includes a function to the Remote maintenance.

IBM Zurich Research

MADE IN IBM LABS: IBM researchers achieve record density on magnetic tape, Zurich, Vienna, January 22, 2010: researchers from IBM Zurich Research (NYSE: IBM) 29.5 gigabits per square inch (around 6.45 cm2) on an advanced test tapes have written in cooperation with the Japanese company FUJIFILM that corresponds to the 39-fachen density of the currently leading industry standard magnetic tape product. 1 this milestone shows that one of the oldest technologies for data storage has the potential, to provide further capacity increases for many years. Today’s announcement signals to customers that the tape storage technology can maintain its cost advantage over hard drive save and Flash and allows future affordable and robust data backup\”, says Cindy Grossman, Vice President, IBM tape storage and archiving systems. Companies use magnetic tape typically large amounts of important data to secure, not regularly used or no access in the Require millisecond range. These include data and video archive, backup files and backup copies in the context of disaster management or regulatory compliance. To achieve the demonstrated record storage density, researchers developed the IBM several new data-recording technology.

In addition she worked during three years intensively with FUJIFILM on the optimization of the next generation of double coated, barium ferrite particles-based magnetic tape. A tape cartridge in the size of one in the industry-standard LTO (linear tape open) specified cartridge up to 35 terabytes could uncompressed data aufnehmen2 with the newly developed technologies and bands. This corresponds to about the 44 fachen3 of the capacity of today’s LTO cartridges of the fourth generation, which have about half the size a VHS video cassette. To illustrate: 35 terabytes correspond to the amount of text in about 35 million books on data. To keep them on, one would need a bookshelf in a length of about 400 kilometres. This demonstration is an important step on the way to the development of tape storage with an areal density of 100 billion bits per square inch.